Internet dating ads

04 Nov

"Someone from an Irish radio station asked me whether the essence of all Internet dating ads was ' Loser seeks Winner,'" he said, "but I think those opinions are really those of younger people, [such as] those under 30 who see no need for Internet dating.

Motto: Have you ever thought to yourself, I am ugly?

Motto: Sick of dating websites filled with ugly, unattractive, desperate fatsos? Darwin Dating was created exclusively for beautiful, desirable people.

Our strict rules and natural selection process ensures all our members have winning looks. Motto: Singles With Food Allergies is a unique on-line singles community!

The personals sections of those 18th century newspapers were also useful for gay men and women to meet lovers, back when homosexuality was still illegal (it remained so in the UK until 1967).

Personal ads went mainstream in the early 20th century, with expectations at a much lower level than their earlier incarnations.

However advertising like this has a long and unbroken history, and was used by many people with some success," Cocks said.

"At that time advertising for pals or for lonely soldiers was fashionable and contemporary — something done by those who were, as they put it in their ads, 'bohemian and unconventional,'" Cocks said.

Dating sites now suit the older single Personal ads became relatively 'acceptable' by the mid to late 1990s, say experts, helped in no small part by the explosion of Internet use.

More and more elements of people's lives, including love, have gone online in the last few years, and self-promotion on the Internet in general is now just a fact of life.

Personal ads have a history going back at least 300 years, according to a new book on the subject entitled "Classified: The Secret History of the Personal Column" (Random House Books, 2009).

Internet dating is just the modern version of the first "matrimonial" agencies of the 1700s, which helped lonely bachelors search for wives through printed ads, said author H. Cocks, a history lecturer at the University of Nottingham, UK.